1994-1998 Ford Mustang Side Scoop Removal

November 11, 2017 | Posted in Helpful Tips, Mustangs | By

I was just asked how you correctly remove the external rear side vent scoops on a 1994-1998 Ford Mustang. They have threaded studs with nuts that must be removed from the INSIDE. Some models have a plastic clip. You need to access these clips or bolts from inside the rear quarter panel. Either behind the interior trim on a coupe or behind the rear vent windows on the convertible. DO NOT JUST TRY TO PULL THEM OFF! They will BREAK! The 1999-2004 use a plastic clip, but it should still be removed from the inside.

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A little bit about Greyhound Package Xpress shipping

February 6, 2014 | Posted in Helpful Tips, Shipping | By

Every so often, when listing large items, I indicate in the listings that the price is for Greyhound Package Xpress shipping. What is it? It’s a service that Greyhound offers, along with their well-known bus services. Packages under 72 inches long and 100 pounds or less are eligible for this service. The packages are placed in the cargo area, along with luggage, and are shipped to the customer’s closest bus terminal for pickup. Price is calculated by length, weight, and the distance it’s traveling. We drop off packages in Akron, Ohio quite a bit.

Why do I choose this? Sometimes, it’s the most economical way to ship large and/or heavy packages. While a Corvette bumper doesn’t weigh much, its nearly 6 feet in length, combined with its width, would cost $150-$200 to ship via FedEx or UPS, if the package is even within their accepted shipping dimensions. The $80 (or less) that we charge for shipping via Greyhound covers the cost of the shipping, plus the cost of the box, for less than half of what it is via common carrier.

I’ve been shipping with Greyhound for 6 years now, in addition to using other services. I have only ever had one major problem, which is the lowest percentage of error among all of the services I use.

What happens, though, is that sometimes customers purchase an item and don’t realize that 1) the package doesn’t come directly to your door, or 2) the closest terminal is not exactly close.

As far as #1 goes, there are a few options. Some locations (but not all) can offer door-to-door service for an additional fee. Customers can also ask for a shipping upgrade to FedEx or UPS, also for an additional fee. Please note that this does NOT include packages that are outside of the common carrier’s weight or dimensions limit.

For #2, my recommendation is to check the Greyhound Package Xpress website at http://www.shipgreyhound.com before buying. Find the closest terminal that is convenient to your home, job, or some other location. Call the number to verify that the location does, in fact, accept packages and has hours convenient to you. In some parts of the country, the closest terminal can be over an hour away. In other parts (like New York,) there is a wider selection of terminals, but some are easier to get to than others. It’s OK to express a preference as to where you want your package to go. However, if picking up a package won’t work for you, please keep in mind that I may or may not be able to ship a particular package by any other method.

This is Greyhound Package Xpress shipping in a rather long nutshell. I won’t throw you under the bus, but your packages will be there 🙂

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It’s almost the New Year

December 30, 2011 | Posted in Helpful Tips, Uncategorized | By

As the new year approaches, I would like to thank each and every one of you for following our blog and other social media sites, and for buying from our Sports Car Salvage eBay store.

Your support has made many endeavors possible. We have been able to contribute to the Yellow Ribbon Fund via Ebay’s Giving Works program. Our summertime spoils added some vigor to Saturdays @ Schumann’s Roadside & Towing cruise-ins. Most recently, we were able to make Christmas happen for some who would otherwise have gotten little to nothing.

Click here to visit our Sports Car Salvage eBay store. If you are looking for items whose purchases contribute to the Yellow Ribbon Fund, look for the blue and yellow ribbon next to the eBay item title.

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How to Remove your Headliner

November 14, 2011 | Posted in Helpful Tips, Mazda | By

Mazda RX-7 GTU headliner

A Mazda RX-7 GTU headliner, which can be found for sale in our eBay store.

After dealing with a handful of Corvettes and a convertible Miata, I had almost forgotten the joys of removing a headliner panel. Let’s face it, removing and replacing a large rectangular piece of pressed cardboard-type stuff covered with cloth is not exactly most people’s idea of fun. But here are some general tips:

First off, if you can find a video on YouTube depicting somebody working on the same car you are, all the better. I find online video guides very helpful when working on cars….that, and there isn’t always a Haynes manual at my disposal.

Make sure that any trim pieces holding the headliner in place have been removed first. Depending on the car, some have trim panels along the sides of the headliner that mount to the car and conceal a row of clips underneath. Others have corners underneath the A pillar trim pieces, which are often held in place by a combination of (often artfully concealed) screws and clips. Take off your sun visors and (if needed) the rear view mirror and interior light assembly.

Get a good idea of what is holding the headliner in place before jumping in with both feet….hands…whatever. I can’t tell you how many interior trim pieces I’ve seen utterly destroyed by the “When In Doubt, Just Yank Harder” approach. You may be dealing with hidden plastic clips a few inches apart, like on the backside of a door panel, plastic screws, or the like. A door panel removal tool and/or a flat-blade screwdriver will be helpful here. The key is to work with care and not get in a rush. We’re talking about a piece of pressed board here that (in some cases) is as big and awkward as your 6th grade science fair tri-fold poster.

A science fair posterboard...

Treat your headliner like one of these. Save the yanking and tugging for rusty undercarriage bolts!

You can give the headliner a gentle tug to get an idea of where it is still attached, but yanking with all of your might is a big no-no.

If you have a sunroof, you may have to remove a piece of trim, weather stripping, or something like it around the perimeter of the sunroof to complete the process. Then, go around the edges with a flat-blade screwdriver just to test the waters. If there aren’t any clips or screws, you may find that all you need to do is gently pry around the edges. Try this in a relatively inconspicuous place.

That’s it…the trick is to go slow, be careful, and NO YANKING!

**Science fair image courtesy of http://www.flickr.com/photos/oakleyoriginals/3229259616/

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